Strange things happen when you walk. Even stranger things happen when you get away and walk for a few days in a row. You start to take in your surrounds, listen to the inner you and celebrate yourself and those around you.

For more details about the walks themselves, you can visit our individual websites: 

Both Feet Cradle Huts

The Bay of Fires Lodge Walk, Cradle Mountain Huts Walk and the Twelve Apostles Walk see these phenomena all the time. We call them Moments of Triumph and they come in all shapes and sizes. A little pat on the back for getting up a steep hill, an inner “well done!” as you pause and look back on the trail, or a deserving “yes please” to the afternoon tea that’s waiting on arrival at the lodge.

When you first hear about one of our walks, you might experience an “I think I can do that” moment, then a triumph when you choose a date. Glee is one of our moments when you kit yourself in groovy walking gear and choose some new shoes. Little triumphs occur when you meet your group for the first time and feel relief they look just like you. And then? Your fun begins. Unpack your life and experience the mindshift as you again feel pride in your achievements; 40, 50, 65km, on your own two feet, under your own steam.

Then, of course there is the “I did it” moment of triumph at the end that will be shared over and over again. But they are just the physical triumphs. We know you will have moments all of your own.

The Bay of Fires Lodge Walk, Cradle Mountain Huts Walk (operated by the Tasmania Walking Company) and the Twelve Apostles Walk by bothfeet are three unique eco-luxe walking experiences that take you on a journey. We only have space for a few thousand people a year from all over the world, so it’s prudent to book early and make your anticipation last as long as you can. Collectively we’ve been operating for 49 years and specialise in helping people explore these amazing landscapes safely, deeply and with care and fun. But most importantly, we provide the canvas for you to relax, explore and be yourself.

Latest Blog Posts

Testimonials

  • Jemma Gardam
    Jemma Gardam
  • Cenk Baban
    Cenk Baban
  • Cheryl & Tony
    Cheryl & Tony
  • Jo and Robert Shanks
    Jo and Robert Shanks
  • Suallyn & Jack Moore
    Suallyn & Jack Moore
  • Darrel
    Darrel
  • Lyndsay
    Lyndsay
  • Sharon Herne
    Sharon Herne
  • Sue & Wanda.QLD
    Sue & Wanda.QLD
Cheryl & Tony
Cheryl & Tony

Cheryl Blake and Tony Leary’s story is one of many moments of triumph

Cheryl & Tony

Cheryl Blake and Tony Leary’s story is one of many moments of triumph on the Cradle Mountain Huts Walk, in which a couple of post-60 weekend warriors (as they describe themselves) overcame a number of hurdles to emerge truly triumphant at the end of what they describe as something “spectacular and stunning.”

Tony had suffered from kidney disease for 30 years, the last three of these marked by particularly poor health. As he puts it, “you have to hit bottom before you get a new kidney.”

As part of his return to good health and to ensure “the great gift of a kidney was given due respect”, Cheryl threw down the challenge to Tony: they should both mark the first anniversary of the operation, not simply let the moment pass but grab it and celebrate what for both was one of the most important moments of triumph in their lives together.

Cheryl and Tony both trained extensively for the walk over nine months, of particular importance for Tony who was of course recuperating. This was a big ask, but neither was going to take the walk for granted, and neither was prepared to sacrifice their enjoyment of this very special event by being ill-prepared.

“These walks are tough,” notes Tony “and we had to be sure we were going to be able to complete it. We also had to convince the tour operator that we were fit enough and able to complete the walk.”

And there was more to come. On the walk itself, Cheryl had her own moment of triumph. She was struck down with gastro the night before the start of the walk, and after two hours she was encouraged by the walking tour guides, Ciara and Kaely (both of whom were concerned for Cheryl’s comfort and safety), that she should stop and not complete the walk.

Cheryl (and Tony) were having none of it, they completed the first day and Cheryl recovered somewhat that first evening at the luxury lodge that is part of the Cradle Mountain Huts Walk (not, as Cheryl points out, that she was partaking of much of the luxurious food!).

Further mishaps included falling over, straining and spraining knees and legs, and falling into bog holes. At one waypoint, Marion’s Lookout, Tony put his backpack on the ground, walked back down to Cheryl and took her backpack from her and carried it to the waypoint for her.

But by day two the lure of fresh scones and the special diet they had both requested prevailed.

And was it worth it?

“It was the most breathtaking of walks, the landscape was stunning, the air wonderful, and the accommodation and hospitality superb,” say Tony and Cheryl.

“We enjoyed two spectacular days of sunshine, two days of light snow and two days of spectacular sunshine again.

“That the walk was a challenge was part of its attraction. We had invested so much in its preparation, and of course we had waited for Tony to return to health, that we were never going to quit and we were never going to consider giving in.

“We started the journey to celebrate one particular moment of triumph, Tony’s new kidney. We ended celebrating a number of moments together with our guides and with our walking partners Ron and Greg.”

The couple are fired up by their experience. They are in the UK and Europe as we go to press, walking in the north of England and Wales, and in the south of France, and they are planning to walk the Milford and Routeburn Tracks in New Zealand in 2015.

As Cheryl and Tony put it, “what a reward, and what a moment of triumph for Tony especially. The pristine scenery, the warm huts, the food cooked by our wonderful guides: we can only speak highly of the whole adventure, how well we were looked after. A big thank you to Cradle Mountain Huts Walk for providing this fantastic experience, a wonderful moment of triumph.”

Jemma Gardam

Gallery

Moments of Triumph customer story

Jemma Gardam

Jemma Gardam takes time out to reconnect with the world

Jemma Gardam is a busy 29-year old studying for her Masters, building her own house and working in Launceston in Tasmania.

When the opportunity to go on the Bay of Fires Lodge Walk was given to her last December, she suddenly realised that it was time to stop for a moment, to reflect and replenish her energy, and to reconnect with a part of Australia she remains passionate about.

She did the walk with a friend and together they were able to drink in the outstanding natural beauty of this part of Tasmania, as well is drink some wonderful wines at the luxury lodge accommodation each night!

“Being able to walk in a landscape that still remains basically unaltered after centuries, in the knowledge that there were some wonderful luxuries awaiting us at the end of the day, really is a magical combination,” she comments. “I’m not a regular walker, so it was important for me to be able to test myself, but also have a realistic chance of being able to succeed. Needless to say I was glad to be able to keep up with the rest of my group, most of whom were quite a bit older than me!”

Jemma Gardam is a busy 29-year old studying for her Masters, building her own house and working in Launceston in Tasmania.

When the opportunity to go on the Bay of Fires Lodge Walk was given to her last December, she suddenly realised that it was time to stop for a moment, to reflect and replenish her energy, and to reconnect with a part of Australia she remains passionate about.

She did the walk with a friend and together they were able to drink in the outstanding natural beauty of this part of Tasmania, as well is drink some wonderful wines at the luxury lodge accommodation each night!

“Being able to walk in a landscape that still remains basically unaltered after centuries, in the knowledge that there were some wonderful luxuries awaiting us at the end of the day, really is a magical combination,” she comments. “I’m not a regular walker, so it was important for me to be able to test myself, but also have a realistic chance of being able to succeed. Needless to say I was glad to be able to keep up with the rest of my group, most of whom were quite a bit older than me!”

A highlight of the walk was seeing indigenous landscapes and middens. Jemma has had her awareness of aboriginal history of Tasmania increased as part of her Masters degree, and seeing evidence of a culture and way of living almost gone was a powerful moment. “The theory is fine, but our colonial history with the indigenous population of Tasmania is not our finest moment, and it was important to connect with the culture, the peoples and the landscape in this way,” she says. “The walk helped make the history real and personal.”

There were plenty of special moments over the four days of the walk, from the massage at one of the lodges to the Bay of Fires itself, with its beach deserted apart from the walking group of eight people. “It really was a case of, turn your back, and you’re alone in a landscape unchanged for thousands of years,” says Jemma.

She says she “didn’t want to go home! The service was wonderful from the very start, and the prospect of having to do my own chores really wasn’t that appealing!”

There were many small moments of triumph scattered through Jemma’s time on the Bay of Fires Walk. What she took away from the walk was a powerful sense of connection with some of the most spectacular landscape imaginable, an environment that really did replenish her spirit.

A highlight of the walk was seeing indigenous landscapes and middens. Jemma has had her awareness of aboriginal history of Tasmania increased as part of her Masters degree, and seeing evidence of a culture and way of living almost gone was a powerful moment. “The theory is fine, but our colonial history with the indigenous population of Tasmania is not our finest moment, and it was important to connect with the culture, the peoples and the landscape in this way,” she says. “The walk helped make the history real and personal.”

There were plenty of special moments over the four days of the walk, from the massage at one of the lodges to the Bay of Fires itself, with its beach deserted apart from the walking group of eight people. “It really was a case of, turn your back, and you’re alone in a landscape unchanged for thousands of years,” says Jemma.

She says she “didn’t want to go home! The service was wonderful from the very start, and the prospect of having to do my own chores really wasn’t that appealing!”

There were many small moments of triumph scattered through Jemma’s time on the Bay of Fires Walk. What she took away from the walk was a powerful sense of connection with some of the most spectacular landscape imaginable, an environment that really did replenish her spirit.

Taking a moment to slow down

Cenk Baban

Moments of Triumph customer story

For food and walking enthusiast Cenk Baban, connecting with nature is an important part of what makes him tick.

As a knowledge worker based in the Sydney CBD, he’s well aware of how disconnected a lifestyle this can be from what he describes as the “real world”, the world of broad, open landscapes and vast perspectives, one most definitely ‘off-grid’.

He understands that he is part of a modern world, but he also understands that this is a world with too little space, too little time, too few opportunities to turn off for a while simply to think and reflect.

So it’s important to him to do all of this from time to time, to fully immerse himself in nature.

To that end he recently completed the Bay of Fires Lodge Walk on Tasmania’s north-east coast. As he puts it, “we are kings of the concrete jungle. But in the country, in areas such as the Bay of Fires, we we are, quite literally, an insignificant dot on the landscape, standing in landscape unchanged for perhaps 40,000 years.”

To Cenk, he loves the physical aspect of doing these walks yet it also reminds him that there is more to life than a desk and a screen.

As Cenk puts it, “it’s important to slow down!”

It starts with the simple act of stepping off the plane on arrival at Launceston Airport. Something is different, something is about to change. A new adjustment to a different pace is needed for the next few days.

He enjoys being disconnected. “Standing on the sand on Forester Beach is a heightened moment of disconnection,” he says. Yet he also enjoyed connecting with the others on the walk at a very basic human level, face to face, in person, talking rather than texting. He loved the ample opportunities the walk brought to have long meaningful conversations. And there’s a sense of a bond shared with the others on the walk, an experience shared by being with just a few people for a few days.

But he’s also a great fan of not having to rough it! “There’s something pleasingly decadent about enjoying great food and wine, and warm, comfortable hospitality each night after what are challenging days walking,” he points out. “Besides I really loved the fact that we were served Tasmanian produce, a good opportunity to appreciate the local flavours” And that contrast, that abrupt move from the outdoor state of physical activity to the indoor state of relaxation, is powerful and meaningful in itself. The luxury at the end of each day enhances the experience. It certainly beat camping. For anyone celebrating a milestone, they are rewarded in the achievement of completing each day’s walk, and in the reward each evening.”

Jo and Robert Shanks

Gallery

Moments of Triumph customer story

Jo and Robert Shanks

Moments of Triumph customer story - Jo and Robert Shanks revisit Cradle Mountain after first walking it four decades years ago, to celebrate the importance of the environment, and 40 years of marriage

For Jo and Robert Shanks, the power and beauty and importance of the environment has been a central part of their lives together for over 40 years.
 
They first walked the Cradle Mountain overland track in 1973, just ten weeks before they were married. It was a wonderful wilderness, essentially untouched since trappers and miners left the region in the early 20th century, apart from track works and a small number of huts providing the most basic of accommodation (shared, as Jo reflects, with “leaks and leeches”.)
 
They had met on an earlier camping trip, and the 1973 Cradle Mountain trek was Robert’s suggestion, something of a Christmas present to Jo.
 
Forty years on and now in their early-sixties, they wanted to celebrate their ruby wedding anniversary by walking the trail once again (this time in more comfort!) and also to reaffirm their commitment to the environment in the face of a request by the Australian Federal Government to remove 74,000 hectares of wilderness from the UNESCO Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area.
 
What was extraordinary was how little the Track had changed, except, as Jo notes, for the creature comforts.
 
The two walks did differ in a number of ways though. The original walk was very much a wilderness trek, from a start point to a destination. Jo and Robert took everything with them - tents, food and clothing. The weather (in December 1973) at the start of the walk was blizzard conditions with snow on the ground, and 37oC at the walk’s end (“which, it has to be said, was preferable!” comments Jo).
 
Jo describes the accommodation 40 years ago as “indifferent” - the occasional leaking hut at various points along the track, only marginally better than the tent they carried with them, Progress on day one was stymied because of the cold and snow. On their first night the couple shared a cold hut with other hikers who had been stranded for four days because of the weather, and who were relieved to discover that, at least in one direction, the trail was open.
 
They did though have time to enjoy the landscape and the natural beauty of the walk. Jo points out that then the challenge was “manage your camera film. Today, it’s manage your camera battery-life.”
 
Move forward 40 years to February 2014. Jo and Robert are set to walk the same trail, this time with the Tasmanian Walking Company, on its Cradle Mountain Huts Walk. “We wanted to remind ourselves of what Tasmania has to offer in natural wilderness,” explains Jo, “and we wanted to do so in comfort this time. We were also intrigued to see whether the environment had changed in the past 40 years, and if so, by how much.” What was astounding to them both was how little the environment had indeed changed. One example is the bridge over the Narcissus River, north of Lake Saint Clair. In 1973 it was a rope bridge with just two lines of wood acting as walkway. In 2014, it’s still a rope bridge, but with a third line of wood!
 
“It was important for us to tread lightly on the wilderness,” explains Jo, “and the modern walk lets us do just this. Forty years ago, very little of the track was groomed, with just a handful of corded walkways. Today, we were able to enjoy the scenery and the expert commentary of the guides on our walk, without having to concentrate as much on the ground in front us, also knowing that we were not doing environmental damage. It was nice not to fall over tree stumps or into holes!”
 
Jo and Robert also appreciated the modern accommodation and were impressed by its ecological credentials.
 
“It’s far ahead of what we experienced 40 years ago!” says Jo. “It’s comfortable, warm and more than enough for an overnight stay. Having our meals cooked for us was of course wonderful. And we loved how well the modern huts have been set into the environment, the careful way that solar power is used, and supplies carefully brought in and waste equally carefully taken out. Even today, from certain angles it’s impossible to spot the huts, which is it should be.”
 
The structured nature of the modern walk allows for more side-treks, something Jo and Robert were unable to do 40 years ago due to constraints imposed by the difficult weather conditions. “This time round, we had more opportunity simply to enjoy the landscape we were walking in,” explains Jo. “We weren’t walking to a destination or to a deadline, and we weren’t carrying supplies. It was a wonderful experience to remind ourselves of why we had first done the walk in 1973, and see and learn more about aspects of the landscape. “It was wonderful having the logistics taken care of for us. We had time and opportunity to savour where we were. Wonderful memories flooded back.”
 
And how did they both feel? “Exhilarated. And we remembered again how important these wilderness spaces are. How they put each of us as individuals into context. Robert and I feel that the scale of landscapes such as Cradle Mountain is important, that we need to protect these areas and also enjoy them.
 
“We felt liberated, returning to the first major walk we did together as a couple. It’s a beautiful part of Australia and a beautiful part of the world. It was a wonderful way to celebrate our own personal moment of triumph.”

Sue & Wanda.QLD
Sue & Wanda.QLD

Thank you for the wonderful experience.

Sue & Wanda.QLD

Everything was so thoughtfully planned and executed. We really loved the way our stay at the lodge perfectly complemented the beauty and challenge of the Great Ocean Walk. Thanks for the kindness, the food, the blister strapping, the foot spas, and of course the laughs. All the best for your continued success.

 



Sharon Herne
Sharon Herne

The walk was amazing.

Sharon Herne

It was bit challenging for me as I haven't done anything like that before. I met some great people, had great laughs and conversations, learnt heaps and experienced the most beautiful environment. Matt and Linton our guides and Tom at the lodge looked after us so well. A unique holiday experience I have recommended to all my friends and family.

Good for the soul.

Darrel
Darrel

This walk has changed my life!

Darrel

I have just returned from walking the Overland Track with Cradle Mountain Huts, it was originally planed for my wife to accompany me but health issues came to a head whilst we were training for the walk and as to not let the team down I was dispatched on my 60th birthday to fly to Launcestion.

The following six days were spent walking some of the most beautiful landscapes imaginable, from start to finish our guides Gemma and Kenna kept everybody entertained, nourished, safe and spoilt rotten they were incredibly attentive, knowledgeable, hardworking and enthusiastic young people that any organization should be proud to have on board.

From Pickup to drop off every thing flowed seamlessly, we were blessed to have had six sunny days of trekking with all the comforts of home in this World Heritage Area. Everybody had their individual needs met mine being time to stop and take photographs and someone to listen to me.

I feel that this walk has changed my life!

Many thanks.

Lyndsay
Lyndsay

Go find out for yourself

Lyndsay

"So, a Yankee, a Canuck, a Swiss and nine Aussies walk into the wilderness"....Sounds like the start of a bad joke! Instead, it was the beginning of an adventure I'm sure we'll always treasure.

With the sun shining, and the sunscreen glowing we set out on a 6 day hike that saw some tackle mountain peaks, others tackle lakes and waterfalls and everyone tackling homemade bread each morning!

A true highlight for me was the night we ate dinner under the watchful eye of Mt. Oakleigh...a true team effort and a fine example of the generous, adventurous spirit a journey like the overland track can invoke in all of us.

I could go on and on with countless tales and phrases coined by our group along the track, but instead let me end with this quote from John Muir...“Thousands of tired, nerve-shaken, over-civilized people are beginning to find out going to the mountains is going home; that wilderness is a necessity...”

Go find out for yourself - I promise you won't regret it.

Suallyn & Jack Moore
Suallyn & Jack Moore

Our experience was way beyond our expectations.

Suallyn & Jack Moore

This was our first walking experience and it certainly will not be our last with plans already afoot for the Cradle Mountain Huts walk.

To be immersed in such an amazing and isolated environment is of course a significant aspect of our trip but our gratitude goes whole heartedly to our guides Cody and Erin. We were curious and delighted in all that was around us, taking it all in at such a relaxing pace, with plenty of time to let our minds wander as we journeyed along spectacular beaches that just seemed to keep giving. Cody and Erin were both so perceptive to our interest, they had an amazing amount of knowledge and a sensitivity to the surrounds, its ecology and history, which they so generously shared with us. Their insights brought such depth to the experience, with the understanding that comes with seeing so much more in the beauty of this breathtaking place.

Cody and Erin's warmth, humour and ease certainly galvanised the group and the conversations that we shared over absolutely divine meals and a few glasses of wine. We met such wonderful and interesting people who shared travels and tales from across the world. We were a diverse group so everyone had an interest in each other, from what we did on a day to day basis to the adventures that come with the joys of travel. 
Everything was organised incredibly well, we felt informed about our plans for the trip and everyday as it unfolded, which we learnt about over a delicious hot breakfast that always included the hospitality of freshly baked bread. 
This was our first walking experience and it certainly will not be our last with plans already afoot for the Cradle Mountain Huts walk. We loved the walking, the swimming, the company, the laughter, the spa (you have to have a bath, truly decadent and so relaxing!) and the scrumptious meals. 

Thank you again to Cody and Erin, we appreciated your energy, your humour and the considered care that you showed to each and everyone of your walkers. Thank you for sharing The Bay of Fires with us, this is certainly the best holiday that we have ever had…very special indeed.